Hemingway at War

Hemingway at War

Hemingway at War “Mort’s attention to detail and contextual richness form an invaluable contribution to Hemingway scholarship and a must-read for Hemingway enthusiasts.” ~ Booklist “As the author of THE HEMINGWAY PATROLS, Terry Mort knows his subject and has employed many print and on-line sources on Hemingway, his wives, his antebellum and postwar life and experiences, as well as related World War II subjects.  The photographic section contains many photos of Hemingway taken with his friends and in the course of his wartime exploits. For those with an interest in...

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The Monet Murders

The Monet Murders

The Monet Murders “Terry Mort writes hard boiled detective fiction like we all imagine it was once written…. Mort’s writing is silky smooth and very readable.” ~ Mark Rose, Bookgasm “A breezy debut noir set in Tinseltown circa 1934. Mort (The Hemingway Patrols) generally keeps the banter-filled proceedings as bubbly as the beverage his handsome protagonist frequent shares with a number of knockouts. Readers will hope to see more of Bruno.” ~ Publishers Weekly “The terms noir and delightful usually aren’t used together, but they pair up happily in this entertaining...

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The Wrath of Cochise

The Wrath of Cochise

The Wrath of Cochise: The Bascom Affair and the Origins of the Apache Wars “This enthralling chronicle of cultural misunderstandings far surpasses the title’s parameters. Mort (The Hemingway Patrols) examines the 1861 kidnapping of the 12-year-old son of a white Arizona rancher, the U.S. army’s efforts to find him, and the decades of cross-cultural violence that ensued when the army blamed the wrong guy… Mort is as equally thorough in describing white society’s views of the natives as he is in illuminating the complex Chiricahuas, their precise and imagery-laden language, leadership...

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Thieves’ Road

Thieves’ Road

Thieves’ Road: The Black Hills Betrayal and Custer’s Path to Little Bighorn “Mort’s enlightening works about Native Americans are remarkable not only for their depth, but also the poetic beauty of his descriptions of their lives, religions and cultures…. Mort’s delightful prose will entice readers of history, geography, Native American studies and sociology. All will revel in the feeling of being in the Dakotas at the end of the 19th century.” — Starred Kirkus Review [SYNOPSIS] In the summer of 1874, Brevet Major General George Armstrong Custer led an expedition...

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The Hemingway Patrols

The Hemingway Patrols

The Hemingway Patrols: Ernest Hemingway and His Hunt for U-Boats “The Hemingway Patrols is modest in length and epic in scope. Writing in a limpid, economical prose that his subject would admire, Terry Mort tells the story of a little-known period in the life of one of America’s greatest novelists and manages to weave all sorts of disparate threads into a harmonious whole. Descriptions of submarine warfare and naval battles alternate with insightful commentaries on Hemingway’s art and career and portraits of his troubled marriage to his third wife, the fascinating Martha Gellhorn. There is...

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Mark Twain on Travel

Mark Twain on Travel

Mark Twain on Travel “Selections from Twain’s five travel books (about excursions to the American West, the Pacific Islands, India, the Middle East and Europe) spotlight some of his choicest writing, though they lose his rich, digressive context. With the success of Innocents Abroad in 1869, Twain churned out travelogues for much-needed money, and refined the successful formula of pitting gullible middle-American protagonists against hardened high priests of the world’s culture. Mort presents Twain’s writing by themes, rather than chronology, starting with a...

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Zane Grey on Fishing

Zane Grey on Fishing

Zane Grey on Fishing “Zane Grey on Fishing offers some of the author’s best writing: don’t let this one get away!” — The Library Journal [SYNOPSIS] Though he made his name and his fortune as an author of Western novels, Zane Grey’s best writing has to do with fishing. There he was free from the conventions of the Western genre and the expectations of the market, and he was able to blend his talent for narrative with his keen eye for detail and humor, much of it self-deprecating, into books and articles that are both informative and exciting. His first...

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Jack London on Adventure

Jack London on Adventure

Jack London on Adventure   [SYNOPSIS] “The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time,” writes Jack London, accurately proclaiming the very ingredients of his full, passionate lifestyle. Bearing a name that is now synonymous with adventure, London seemed to fear nothing, constantly stretching his comfortable limits–composing his classic short stories at one thousand words every morning, sailing across the Pacific Ocean on voyages both for pleasure and profit, horseback riding, continual...

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The Voyage of the Parzival

The Voyage of the Parzival

The Voyage of the Parzival “Terry Mort is an author extraordinaire.” — Ann LaFarge, The Hudson Valley News [SYNOPSIS] The first novel in the Ethan Grey trilogy. “It’s not my fight,” said Ethan Grey. It didn’t matter. Mexico was at war, and he was in it. He’d wanted a cruise in warm waters, a chance to forget the war he’d just fought, the War Between the States. But the ship he chose so casually had another mission, and like it or not Ethan Grey was on board. The storms at sea, the battles with enemy ships, the long trip overland through hostile...

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At Last! A Novel Of Life, Love, Temptation…

At Last! A Novel Of Life, Love, Temptation…

At Last! A Novel Of Life, Love, Temptation and the Cubs “If one test of [Mort’s] skill is to keep the reader turning pages after he guesses the ending, the acid test is to get a reader hooked even though he knows what happens before he opens the book.” — The Washington Times “Terry Mort’s splendid novel, At Last!, picks up on the Faustian themes found in Douglass Wallop’s The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant (made into the movie Damn Yankees). But rather than being merely derivative, Mort’s wise and witty sensibility turns this traditional material...

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The Fox and the Hedgehog

The Fox and the Hedgehog

The Fox and the Hedgehog: A Novel of Wolfe and Montcalm at Quebec   [SYNOPSIS] “Measured by the numbers engaged, the Battle of Quebec was but a heavy skirmish; measured by the results, it was one of the great battles of the world.” — Francis Parkman. When the British defeated the French at Quebec in 1759, they not only guaranteed Britain’s acquisition of Canada but also, unwittingly, paved the way for the American Revolution. But this is a larger story than just the single day of battle on September 13, 1759. The final action was the culmination of a summer-long...

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Showdown at Verity

Showdown at Verity

Showdown at Verity “A powerful new voice in Western fiction.” — L. J. Martin [SYNOPSIS] The second novel in the Ethan Grey trilogy. Ethan Grey has seen too many good people die to regret killing the bad ones. An educated man, a former sailor who shelled Vicksburg for the Union Navy, Grey has come to Hell’s own training ground on the Mexican border. The Pinkertons want him to find out who hijacked an army payroll and left eight soldiers dead beneath the blazing sun. Amid ambush and bloody betrayal, he’s right at home. [RECOMMENDED READING] Books 1 & 3 in the Ethan...

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The Lawless Breed

The Lawless Breed

The Lawless Breed   [SYNOPSIS] The third novel in the Ethan Grey trilogy. T. A. [Terry] Mort is a shining new star in Western fiction. His novels are drenched in period detail and evoke a time in American Western history (the 1880s) that few writers have been able to capture successfully. His work is colorful, with solid, believable characterizations. Mort writes in the tradition of the finest Western storytellers: Ernest Haycox, Louis L’Amour, and Larry McMurtry. Mort’s protagonist, Ethan Gray, like Brand’s Destry and L’Amour’s Sackett Brothers, is larger...

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The Reasonable Art of Fly Fishing

The Reasonable Art of Fly Fishing

The Reasonable Art of Fly Fishing [FROM THE FORWARD] “If I were asked to teach someone to fish with a fly I would require that he read this book first.  One of the acid tests of an introductory book…is that the text allow the reader to learn a skill independent of the illustrations. Fly casting is very difficult to teach in person, and even more so in print, yet this book contains the best, the most interesting, and the most effective introduction to fly casting I have ever read.  I think Terry Mort puts the emphasis in the right places…He doesn’t neglect entomology, but he...

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